women's rights

As We Celebrate International Women's Day

It is a privilege to work in a female dominated industry for a strong woman and at a female founded business. I have always been lucky to have been surrounded by strong female role models and to have grown up in an era and a country (Australia) where I could, for the most part, be my badass female self. That does not mean that I think we are treated equally - we’re not.

Chatting with a cinematographer client recently I was shocked to hear that in my new home, The United States of America, women are still not equal in The Constitution. I want to discuss the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) to bring it into the light for those of us who think we have done enough and that Feminism has come far enough and that we are treated equally because we’re not.

The ERA was was originally written by Alice Paul and was first introduced in Congress in 1923. That’s right - almost 100 years ago.

Alice Paul

Alice Paul

The Equal Rights Amendment is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution designed to guarantee equal legal rights for all American citizens regardless of sex; it seeks to end the legal distinctions between men and women in terms of divorce, property, employment, and other matters.

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The Equal Rights Amendment was passed by Congress on March 22, 1972 and sent to the states for ratification. In order to be added to the Constitution, it needs approval by legislatures in three-fourths (38) of the 50 states. Our state, California ratified Nov. 13, 1972.

On May 30, 2018, Illinois became the 37th state. We now need just 1 more state to ratify for the ERA to officially become an amendment to the United States Constitution.

ERA bills have also been introduced in the legislatures of Arizona, Florida, North Carolina, Utah, and Virginia.

If you are registered to vote in these states, it’s time, call your representatives and tell them to ratify the ERA.

"The Equal Rights Amendment: Unfinished Business for the Constitution" is a 17-minute educational video that traces the changing status of women's rights in the United States from the writing of the Constitution to the 72-year struggle for woman suffrage to the ongoing campaign for the ERA. This is a 5-minute excerpt.

To order the full video on DVD you can follow this link .